Occupational Wellbeing

Hybrid Working Lingo: The Top 5 Buzzwords You Need to Know

December 7, 2022
The Wellness Tribe

In the era of hybrid working, several buzzwords have become increasingly important to understand. These terms can help us navigate the changing landscape of work and communicate effectively about the ways in which we are working. 

In this article, we will discuss five of the most important buzzwords in the hybrid working era: Frolleagues, distributed teams, asynchronous communication, Proximity Bias, and Productivity Paranoia.

Frolleagues

Frolleagues : Hybrid Working Lingo - Top 5 buzzwords you need to know
Photo by Microsoft 365 on Unsplash

Frolleagues are individuals who are both colleagues and friends, and the frolleague relationship can begin as a professional one and then evolve into a friendship. It is common for people who work together to form close bonds and friendships, especially if they spend a lot of time together and have shared experiences.

It is essential to recognise that different people may have different boundaries around their work relationships, and it is important to respect those boundaries. It is also important to be mindful of the potential risks or challenges that can arise when mixing professional and personal relationships and to communicate openly and honestly with frolleagues about expectations and boundaries.

If you are an introvert struggling to socialize here's our guide of : Social Networking When You Hate It - An Introvert's Guide

Distributed Teams

A distributed team is a group of individuals who work together but are not physically located in the same place. This type of team is common in the era of hybrid working, as it allows for a mix of remote and in-office work. With distributed teams, it is important to establish clear communication channels and set expectations for collaboration and communication.

Asynchronous Communication

Asynchronous communication is a term used to describe forms of communication that do not require all parties to be present simultaneously. This can include emails, instant messaging, and other forms of written communication. In the era of hybrid working, asynchronous communication is important for allowing team members to collaborate and communicate effectively, even when they are not all in the exact location.

Proximity Bias

Proximity bias refers to the tendency to favour or give preferential treatment to individuals who are physically present or close to themselves. This bias can manifest in various ways in the workplace, such as providing more opportunities or attention to employees who are physically present in the office or overlooking the contributions or needs of remote workers.

Proximity bias can harm employees working remotely or not physically present in the office, as it may lead to a lack of equal opportunities or recognition for their contributions. It can also negatively impact team dynamics and morale, as it may create a sense of unfairness or inequality among team members.

Productivity Paranoia

Productivity paranoia: Hybrid working lingo: top 5 buzzwords you need to know
Photo by Dasha Yukhymyuk on Unsplash

Productivity paranoia refers to the anxiety or stress individuals may feel around their ability to be productive, especially in the modern workplace. This anxiety may be fueled by societal or cultural pressures to be constantly productive and achieve high levels of success, as well as by a lack of work-life balance or a lack of support from employers or colleagues.

In the era of hybrid working, productivity paranoia may be exacerbated by the challenges of working remotely, such as the blurring of boundaries between work and home life or the need to juggle multiple responsibilities. It may also be fueled by the fear of not being seen as a valuable contributor to the team or organisation or by the fear of being left behind in an increasingly competitive job market.

Closing Words

In conclusion, as a corporate wellness company, we always stay attuned to the buzzwords and trends shaping the modern workplace, especially in the era of hybrid work. However, by understanding the terms, we can better support the health and well-being of employees as they navigate this new way of working.

It is also crucial for us to recognise the potential challenges and risks that may arise in a hybrid work environment, such as productivity paranoia and proximity bias. By addressing these issues and promoting inclusivity and equity, we can create a healthy and supportive workplace for all employees, regardless of their physical location. Overall, the era of hybrid work presents both opportunities and challenges. By staying informed and proactive, we can continue to support the well-being of employees in this evolving landscape.

Productivity

How to Maximize Your Efficiency While Working From Home

October 12, 2022
The Wellness Tribe

It can be challenging for many of us to work remotely or in the office when productivity drops, and with it come new obstacles in the workplace. In the face of distractions, interruptions, and the constant need to maintain an adaptable mentality, it may be challenging to manage, pursue, and commit to new strategies to increase job performance.

Regardless of where you are in your career or how you got there, growing yourself professionally should be an ongoing exercise that challenges and inspires you.

Putting it off is a bad idea until your manager brings it up in your performance review. By following these strategies, you can elevate your professional game and become your most productive self, in addition to improving your health and wellbeing at workplace.

Why Remote Work Is a Good Idea

Why Remote Work Is a Good Idea
Photo by Windows on Unsplash

There is a preferred work environment for everyone. Some prefer complete solitude, while others need the hustle of a coffee shop to stay focused. But, no matter our individual preferences, none of us enjoy working with noisy colleagues.

Here are some statistics to consider: 

  • There is a 61 percent belief that noisy coworkers are the most distracting factor at work; 
  • To maximize efficiency, 86% prefer working alone; and 
  • There is a 40% perception that spontaneous meetings are a huge distraction in the workplace.

The good thing about working remotely is you don't have to deal with all these distractions. Although it may sound harsh, the best advice is to solve your own problems. Do not ask questions that Google cannot answer. Don't put yourself in a position where you need to be micromanaged.

The Pomodoro Method

Working nonstop for a long time starts to fry your brain. On the other hand, experts claim that working in 90-minute increments increases productivity.

There is a limit to how long the human mind can work before it has to rest, which is 90 to 120 minutes in reality. So give yourself a break after 90 minutes and focus entirely on the most critical item on your priority list.

You may want to explore the Pomodoro Technique if you aren't satisfied with recurring 90-minute work periods. Focus on one assignment for 25 minutes. Then, take five minutes to rest. Make three more repetitions of this method.

In case your workplace has an employee wellbeing program, chances are you've already introduced the Pomodoro method. If not, consider doing so in the future. 

How to Overcome Procrastination

‍How to Overcome Procrastination
Photo by Magnet.me on Unsplash

Typical workers spend 2 hours a day procrastinating. A typical individual takes 23 minutes to regain focus after being sidetracked. Sound familiar, doesn't it?

Some of the distractions we enjoy are keeping an eye on Twitter, reading the news, organizing our inboxes, and cleaning our desks. A frightening aspect of our behavior is that we are quite adept at convincing ourselves that such distractions are part of our job description. With the increasing size and importance of assignments, most people are becoming more prone to procrastinating.

However, we should not let ourselves be fooled: when we delay, we focus on the worst aspects of our endeavor, which makes the task seem even bigger. Rather, follow our favorite advertising campaign: Simply do it and consider your priorities list.

Don't let email be your afternoon escape, even if you avoided it in the morning. Individuals check their email 36 times per hour on average. This amounts to 13 hours spent reading, deleting, sorting, and sending weekly emails. You don't have to respond to an incoming email immediately. Keep a regular schedule of checking your email throughout the day instead of rushing.

Creative Exhaustion

Creativity is a crucial trait of a successful employee, whether you spend your days creating art in Illustrator or crunching figures in Excel. But how can you stop an afternoon brain cramp when creative thoughts appear out of reach? 

Keep your research time limited so that you can overcome procrastination. Getting lost in a sea of GIFs and further away from your starting point can be an easy trap. So to jumpstart your momentum and prevent afternoon headaches, turn your gaze away from your device.

On average, people spend 7.4 hours per day in front of a computer screen. Taking a diary into a brainstorming session will prevent dry eyes. Consider drawing a flowchart or doodling to get a better sense of the scale of your project. 

Finally, use your downtime to brainstorm. There is no denying the fact that many of our best ideas come while driving or taking a shower, so it is important to be able to leave work at work.

Mastering the Art of Working Remotely

In recent years, remote labor has been on the rise. But, in addition to its apparent advantages, working remotely also has its disadvantages. The benefits are a 30-second commute, greater flexibility, and more control over your surroundings.

Remote work can be difficult to separate professional and family lives without physically separating them.

Additionally, you may find it difficult to focus while roommates, children, and spouses are in the background. 

Establish a Home Office or Desk

If you feel like working from your bed or sofa, we recommend doing so for a change of scenery. Working from home, however, requires consistency. Establish your main workstation at the kitchen table or at a desk during the day.

It will help you associate that location with efficiency, productivity, and work. In addition, you get bonus points if you equip the site with dual monitors, a charging station, and anything else you need to get the job done.

Prepare Yourself for a Lot of Communication

Working remotely makes your team members and management less likely to become entangled in unexpected verbal brainstorming sessions. Consider checking in with them more often than usual. Communicate your objectives and initiatives to your team or collaborators.

Get your coworkers together for a coffee chat or remote Zoom meeting. Be sure to clarify any unclear details in emails or virtual meetings. Despite being away from your workplace, don't let yourself go unnoticed.

Setting Your Logoff Time

There are many challenges associated with working from home. For example, some days, you'll want to log out at 3, while on other days, you'll want to work until 8 p.m. Having the freedom to work from home is excellent, but don't let it compromise your well-being. 

By setting a logoff time, you’ll be able to stay productive until the end of the day, and you’ll know exactly when it’s time to watch TV, cook dinner, or go for a walk with your spouse.

HR Report

Gartner Report Unveils 2024's Top 5 HR Priorities

November 1, 2023
Nitesh Padghan

As we step into 2024, the corporate world is not just evolving; it's transforming at a pace like never before. For HR leaders, this means navigating through a maze of new challenges and opportunities. 

Based on Gartner's extensive survey of over 500 HR leaders across diverse industries and countries, we've pinpointed the top five priorities for HR in 2024. These aren't just trends; they're the signposts guiding HR professionals through a landscape that's changing under our feet. 

From redefining leadership roles to embracing cutting-edge HR technology, these priorities are reshaping the way we think about work, culture, and employee engagement. Let's dive into each of these priorities, understanding their nuances and the strategies to address them effectively.

A New Era of Leadership

In the realm of HR, the development of leaders and managers is paramount. Gartner's survey reveals a startling 73% of HR leaders believe their leaders and managers aren't equipped for change. This is a big deal. Why? Because change is the only constant in today's business world. The solution isn't more training; it's about rethinking the role itself.

First, let's talk about resetting expectations. It's about empowering managers to focus on what they do best – leading and developing their teams. This means less time on admin and more on people. 

Next, we need to rewire habits. Good management isn't just about skills; it's about daily habits that build a strong team culture. Finally, rebuilding the manager pipeline is crucial. This means giving potential managers a real taste of the role, letting them decide if it's right for them. It's about making the role fit the person, not the other way around.

Building Connected Cultures Remotely

Organizational culture is next on the list. It's about how people feel at work. Do they feel connected? Do they believe in what they're doing? In a hybrid world, this is tougher than ever. Gartner points out that 47% of HR leaders are struggling with this in the new work environment.

The key here is intentionality. Culture doesn't just happen; it's built. It's about aligning everyone with the company's vision and values. Then, there's connectedness. In a world where remote work is common, creating a sense of belonging is crucial. 

This means more than just virtual happy hours. It's about meaningful interactions that build a community. Lastly, microcultures in teams can make a big difference. Each team has its own vibe, and nurturing this can strengthen the overall culture.

The HR Tech Transformation

HR technology is a big talking point. With 56% of HR leaders saying their current tech doesn't meet their needs, it's clear there's a gap. The future is about AI and advanced tech, but only 22% of HR leaders are actively engaged in this conversation. That's a problem.

First, understanding the tech landscape is crucial. What's out there? What fits our needs? Then, it's about readiness. Is our workforce ready for this tech? Do they have the skills to use it effectively? 

Lastly, ethics and risks can't be ignored. With any new tech, especially AI, understanding the ethical implications is key. We need to ask the tough questions before diving in.

Leading Through Transition

Change management is all about helping people adapt. But here's the thing: 82% of HR leaders say their managers aren't equipped for this. Employees are feeling the strain, with many reporting lower trust and engagement levels.

The solution? It's a threefold approach. First, communicate. People need to understand what's changing and why. Second, quality training is non-negotiable. People need the right tools to adapt. Finally, managing fatigue is crucial. Change is exhausting, and acknowledging this is the first step to helping employees cope.

Redefining Growth in the Workplace

Lastly, we have career management and internal mobility. The stats are worrying – 66% of HR leaders think their company's career paths aren't compelling. This is about giving employees a roadmap for their future in the company.

First, it's about moving away from rigid career paths. The future is fluid, and career paths should be too. Next, it's about aligning roles with experiences, not just job titles. 

This means thinking about what skills and experiences employees gain in each role. Finally, it's about support. Employees need guidance and tools to navigate their career journey within the company.

Final Thoughts

In wrapping up, it's clear that the HR landscape in 2024 is about much more than policies and payroll. It's about leading through change, building cultures that thrive in hybrid environments, leveraging technology smartly, managing change compassionately, and carving out dynamic career paths for employees. 

By addressing these priorities, HR leaders can not only navigate the complexities of the modern workplace but also shape it into an environment where both the organization and its people can flourish. The future of work is here, and it's time for HR to lead the charge, turning challenges into opportunities for growth, innovation, and lasting success.

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