Worklife

Thriving After a Layoff: A Resilience Guide for the Team Still Standing

Layoffs are unfortunate in the modern workplace, but they don't have to dictate your professional future. By embracing emotional complexity, strengthening bonds with affected colleagues, reinventing your role, and preparing for the road ahead, you can not only survive but thrive after a layoff.

May 1, 2023
Mohit Sahni

Layoffs have become an unfortunate reality in today's ever-changing economic landscape. While those who lose their jobs bear the brunt of the impact, the ripple effect also reaches the remaining employees. In this article, we delve deeper into the challenges faced by surviving employees and discuss how corporate wellness programs, like those offered by Power8, can provide vital support during these difficult times.

Embracing Emotional Complexity

A layoff can trigger a wide range of emotions in the employees left behind. They may experience relief at retaining their jobs, guilt for their colleagues' misfortune, and anxiety about their own job security. It's crucial to acknowledge these emotions and not suppress them.

Instead of letting these feelings overwhelm you, seek mental health support when necessary. Many companies offer counseling services and mental health resources, which can provide a safe space to explore and process your emotions.

Creating a healthy work-life balance is also essential during this period. Establish boundaries between your personal and professional life to provide a safe haven for yourself when work feels unstable or overwhelming.

Strengthening Bonds with Affected Colleagues

Maintaining a strong bond with colleagues who have been laid off is vital, as it shows solidarity and strengthens your professional network. Reach out to them with genuine empathy, offering assistance wherever possible.

For instance, share job leads or connect them to potential job opportunities. Offer to provide feedback on their resumes, cover letters, or LinkedIn profiles, which can give them a competitive edge in their job search. You show your support and build lasting professional relationships by standing by your colleagues during these difficult times.

Reinventing Your Role

Layoffs can lead to a redistribution of job responsibilities among the remaining employees. This can be both an opportunity for growth and a potential source of stress and burnout. To manage this transition effectively, schedule a meeting with your manager to discuss your new job expectations and responsibilities.

Keep a record of your accomplishments, additional tasks, and increased workload, as this information will prove invaluable when negotiating promotions or raises in the future. Embrace growth opportunities that arise during this challenging period, as they can help you develop new skills and enhance your professional profile.

Rediscovering Your Professional Purpose

Use the period of change following a layoff as an opportunity to reassess your job satisfaction and fulfillment. Evaluate which tasks energize you and which ones drain you. Seek feedback from colleagues and managers to identify areas of improvement and growth.

Reflect on whether your current role and organization align with your values, passions, and goals. If the alignment no longer exists, consider exploring new opportunities within or outside the company that better match your interests and aspirations.

Envisioning Your Ideal Future

Having a clear vision of your desired skills and experiences will help you navigate your career path more effectively. Explore new opportunities within the company that align with your interests, or stay ahead of industry trends and innovations that could impact your role.

For instance, consider how technological advancements, such as artificial intelligence, might affect your industry and job. By proactively positioning yourself as a valuable asset, you increase your chances of long-term success.

Preparing for the Road Ahead

When discussing your long-term goals with your manager, be mindful of timing. It's best to wait until the situation feels more stable, typically three to six months after a layoff. Most managers appreciate employees who are proactive in adding value to the company, especially during challenging times.

If suitable opportunities are unavailable within your organization, consider seeking external openings that align with your future goals. Keep your resume, portfolio, and LinkedIn profile updated, and connect with hiring managers or apply to new positions that interest you. By preparing for the road ahead, you ensure you're ready to seize new opportunities.

Power8's Corporate Wellness Programs

In the aftermath of a layoff, employees may struggle with their mental and emotional well-being. This is where Power8's employee wellness programs can make a significant difference. These programs provide essential support to employees, helping them navigate the challenges they face while boosting their overall well-being.

Power8's employee wellness programs are designed to address employees' unique needs, especially during organizational change. They offer tools and resources that promote physical, mental, and emotional health. By focusing on holistic well-being, these programs foster a resilient workforce capable of thriving in the face of adversity.

Final Words

Layoffs are unfortunate in the modern workplace, but they don't have to dictate your professional future. By embracing emotional complexity, strengthening bonds with affected colleagues, reinventing your role, rediscovering your professional purpose, envisioning your ideal future, and preparing for the road ahead, you can not only survive but thrive after a layoff. 

Power8's corporate wellness programs offer the support and resources needed to navigate these turbulent times, ensuring that companies and employees emerge stronger and more resilient than ever.

Productivity

The Productivity Guide - How to Be More Productive at Work

September 15, 2022
The Wellness Tribe

We've all experienced a bad day while working from home.

You begin your day on a positive note. However, the deadline for a large project is approaching, and you don't have time to complete it. So, instead of staying on track and getting an early start, you get distracted by anything but work.

The majority of your workday is spent on Twitter, Slack, and LinkedIn. We won't even talk about email. So those ambitions of completing the assignment before lunch become far away.

You aren't alone: office workers spend 28% of their time on unnecessary distractions. In addition to this, an average of five hours are spent each week visiting non-work-related websites.

As soon as you put those useless distractions aside, you're hit by midday hunger pangs, and all you want is food. As a result of wasting your whole morning, your mind explodes into a frenzy, and your anxious afternoon transforms into an evening full of stress.

Try to imagine what it would be like if you had a productive workday every day; imagine what it would be like if it became a habit.

At first, you will need to put in more time and effort. Our recommendations, however, may be helpful for long-term adjustments in your work routine with a bit of self-reflection and forward thinking.

Starting Your Day

The Productivity Guide - How to Be More Productive at Work
Photo by ian dooley on Unsplash

A day's work can be set in stone within its first hour. But, with a couple of mistakes, you will find it's already 11 a.m., having no idea where the first two hours of your day went.

Morning productivity is all about developing habits that will last. So if you're looking for something to do on Monday, instead of opening Facebook, open Google Docs instead.

A Few Things To Start With

Starting your day with a nutritious meal will set you up for success. Dietary choices affect your productivity at work, as they provide everything your mind body soul needs.

It is recommended to consume low-glycemic carbohydrate diets throughout the day to maintain consistent energy levels. For those of us who aren't nutritionists, this means lots of fruits and vegetables. In addition, an egg, banana, yogurt, or blueberry breakfast may improve memory and relieve stress.

You should resist the urge to look at your e-mail when you first arrive at your workstation. You might lose your most valuable thinking hours early in the morning if you start your day reading, responding, and sorting your inbox.

The constant checking of your email will also become a habit. Reading your email while you commute to work is an excellent idea if you don't drive to work. If you have any important to-do items to check in your email before heading out to work, allocate five to ten minutes for them.

Once you have inspected it briefly, please turn it off. You will notice the difference in your productivity.

"Productivity is never an accident. It is always the result of a commitment to excellence, intelligent planning, and focused effort." - Paul J. Meyer

The Little Things

Do you still want to open Gmail? You can achieve productivity goals most easily by developing "tiny habits." Tiny habits are simple, ongoing activities that create long-term behavioural changes.

For new behaviours to stick, consider the following factors:

1. Motivating factors that may assist in changing a habit.

2. Acts that make the new habit easy to form.

3. A stimulus that results in an action.

If you know that email is a huge distraction for you, schedule times to check it. Then, treat yourself to a snack break if you finish it in less than 15 minutes. Try this strategy for any habit you wish to create, such as reading or meditating, and you will have a perfect work life balance.

Setting Priorities

The Productivity Guide - How to Be More Productive at Work
Photo by Firmbee.com on Unsplash

It may not be ideal for everyone to have an organised to-do list, but we could all benefit from it. First, sort chores into priority levels and categorise them accordingly. Prioritising the simplest chores is tempting, but setting priority levels will remind you to focus on the bigger tasks first.

Identify Your Distractions

A diagnosis is essential to administering the correct treatment in medicine. In addition, it is essential to understand what precisely distracts you if you want to establish productive habits that last months, not days.

Using time tracking software or good old-fashioned pen and paper, keep track of how you spend your time for a week. Record when you encounter distractions and what they are during the process. 

Review your work time at the end of each week. Analyse patterns of cause and effect. For example, you may fall victim to reading the news while working. Then you scroll for 30 minutes on social media after checking your email.

The process of documenting your week may seem overwhelming to many people. They may claim that it will take a considerable amount of time. But don't ignore this one. You might have more work for one week, but you'll save hundreds of hours later.

A Remote Work Environment

Nowadays, more and more people work from home. Indeed, you're not distracted by co-workers at home, but that doesn't mean you're untouched by distractions. Homeworkers often become their own worst enemies when working from home.

Conclusion

Whenever possible, try to replicate your regular weekday on your off-days. A regular schedule of waking up, showering, and dressing as if you were going to work is important. Working from home doesn't mean staying at home all day.

Go to a coffee shop to avoid the temptation to clean the bathroom or organise your bookcases. Instead, commit to accomplishing more - preferably ahead of the weekly demands - when you work from home.

Occupational Wellbeing

Hybrid Working Lingo: The Top 5 Buzzwords You Need to Know

December 7, 2022
The Wellness Tribe

In the era of hybrid working, several buzzwords have become increasingly important to understand. These terms can help us navigate the changing landscape of work and communicate effectively about the ways in which we are working. 

In this article, we will discuss five of the most important buzzwords in the hybrid working era: Frolleagues, distributed teams, asynchronous communication, Proximity Bias, and Productivity Paranoia.

Frolleagues

Frolleagues : Hybrid Working Lingo - Top 5 buzzwords you need to know
Photo by Microsoft 365 on Unsplash

Frolleagues are individuals who are both colleagues and friends, and the frolleague relationship can begin as a professional one and then evolve into a friendship. It is common for people who work together to form close bonds and friendships, especially if they spend a lot of time together and have shared experiences.

It is essential to recognise that different people may have different boundaries around their work relationships, and it is important to respect those boundaries. It is also important to be mindful of the potential risks or challenges that can arise when mixing professional and personal relationships and to communicate openly and honestly with frolleagues about expectations and boundaries.

If you are an introvert struggling to socialize here's our guide of : Social Networking When You Hate It - An Introvert's Guide

Distributed Teams

A distributed team is a group of individuals who work together but are not physically located in the same place. This type of team is common in the era of hybrid working, as it allows for a mix of remote and in-office work. With distributed teams, it is important to establish clear communication channels and set expectations for collaboration and communication.

Asynchronous Communication

Asynchronous communication is a term used to describe forms of communication that do not require all parties to be present simultaneously. This can include emails, instant messaging, and other forms of written communication. In the era of hybrid working, asynchronous communication is important for allowing team members to collaborate and communicate effectively, even when they are not all in the exact location.

Proximity Bias

Proximity bias refers to the tendency to favour or give preferential treatment to individuals who are physically present or close to themselves. This bias can manifest in various ways in the workplace, such as providing more opportunities or attention to employees who are physically present in the office or overlooking the contributions or needs of remote workers.

Proximity bias can harm employees working remotely or not physically present in the office, as it may lead to a lack of equal opportunities or recognition for their contributions. It can also negatively impact team dynamics and morale, as it may create a sense of unfairness or inequality among team members.

Productivity Paranoia

Productivity paranoia: Hybrid working lingo: top 5 buzzwords you need to know
Photo by Dasha Yukhymyuk on Unsplash

Productivity paranoia refers to the anxiety or stress individuals may feel around their ability to be productive, especially in the modern workplace. This anxiety may be fueled by societal or cultural pressures to be constantly productive and achieve high levels of success, as well as by a lack of work-life balance or a lack of support from employers or colleagues.

In the era of hybrid working, productivity paranoia may be exacerbated by the challenges of working remotely, such as the blurring of boundaries between work and home life or the need to juggle multiple responsibilities. It may also be fueled by the fear of not being seen as a valuable contributor to the team or organisation or by the fear of being left behind in an increasingly competitive job market.

Closing Words

In conclusion, as a corporate wellness company, we always stay attuned to the buzzwords and trends shaping the modern workplace, especially in the era of hybrid work. However, by understanding the terms, we can better support the health and well-being of employees as they navigate this new way of working.

It is also crucial for us to recognise the potential challenges and risks that may arise in a hybrid work environment, such as productivity paranoia and proximity bias. By addressing these issues and promoting inclusivity and equity, we can create a healthy and supportive workplace for all employees, regardless of their physical location. Overall, the era of hybrid work presents both opportunities and challenges. By staying informed and proactive, we can continue to support the well-being of employees in this evolving landscape.

Join the Wellness Tribe

Join The Tribe

This month we are focusing on food and how it affects your mental health. Join us as we bring in the most relevant interesting content from across the wellness segment.

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.